Rewaco Trike Owners Club UK

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Forum Home > Rewaco Trike Common Accessories / Parts > Grimaco Brakes

Smoggy
Member
Posts: 4

Bought a new Grimaco Caliper in January. Went for a ride out, and the front brake locked up, blowing the rubber brake piston boots.

Managed to get a replacement set of boots. Went for a ride out at the weekend, guesse what......   yup !!!!

I have been advised the spring inside the brake cylinder might be sticking.   A freind suggested the caliper might be too small for the size of the trike, therefore too much pressure on the front caliper.

Before I end up on the marble slab, does anyone have any past history with Grimaco Brakes and calipers, and does anyone have any advice?

Please understand I am not mechanically minded, therefore keep any advice simple .....

Many thanks to all in advance.

 

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8)  Smoggy !!

June 21, 2011 at 8:18 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Triker and Lady Triker
Moderator
Posts: 122

Hi Smoggy

You dont mention why you brought a new caliper in January in the first place, was it because you had a problem with the front brake sticking with the old caliper? If so read on......

.......the problem is not with the caliper.

The problem I have previously had was that the master cylinder, which was slightly corroded due to the trike standing (possibly in a damp garage). Everytime the the brakes were pressed the piston went into the master cylinder but did not return fully due to the corrosion in the top of the cylinder this eventually gets worse and worse till it locks the front wheel solid due to the system being still under pressure.

I managed to correct this by removing the master cylinder (under the false tank), removing the rubber boot on the end of the master cylinder, pushing the piston into the cylinder to reveal a small amout of corrosion inside the cylinder. I then carefully removed this with a small rotary bristle brush. Thoroughly cleaned the area and its been alright ever since - 3,000miles and still ok. ( although there is a strong chance it could leak after refitting and you could need a new slave cylinder)

Hope this helps 

 

Triker

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June 22, 2011 at 2:53 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Smoggy
Member
Posts: 4

Triker, Many thanks for your reply.

The reason I bought a new caliper, was that the plastic dust cap was "melted" and I was aware there was some kind of problem. I bought the trike with only 13,000 KM on the clock, which is pretty low for a 10 year old machine. I think the trike had been garaged for about 5 months prior to me purchsing it. Therefore hadn't been used.

The guys (Tony) at Rewaco UK suggested this might be the problem. I will wait a couple of days until the weather dries up, and have a go at cleaning the brake cylinder.

Once done, i will post the results for all to see.

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8)  Smoggy !!

June 23, 2011 at 4:34 AM Flag Quote & Reply

mike
Member
Posts: 99


July 17, 2011 at 5:19 AM Flag Quote & Reply

mike
Member
Posts: 99

For those who want to do their own brake maintenance, the Grimaco  break caliper are normally fitted on the  Peugeot Push scooters  and the rear brake  caliper pads are again Peugeot 306/ 405     Cheers Mike


July 17, 2011 at 5:55 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Max
Member
Posts: 33

Hi , I had the same problem . It turned out that the brake lever was'nt returning fully. The pivot was rusty so a good clean up  & then well greased. There is a plastic bush  on the pivot that sticks to the rust.  A quick way of checking is to press the brake and see if it moves back fully. If you can move it back any more, then clean it.  For parts see my other Post from months ago.  Good Luck.

July 18, 2011 at 7:34 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Smoggy
Member
Posts: 4

Update !!!    As I am a catering manager, and pretty clueless on mechanics, I thought I would shoot this to you.

I had a "bike" mechanic remove the master cylinder, clean and refurb it, putting it back on the trike, in the meantime, he sourced new rubbers for the front caliper. So far so good. however, on bleeding the brakes, he discovered the left rear brake was bleeding fluid. The piston on the rear drum brakes required repairing, and was passed on to a third party. When this was returned, it was then fitted to the trike, and hey ho, the piston bleed nipple was fecked. So a new piston was purchased / fitted.

After 24 days I received my trike back. The first two mile went without incident, then the brakes went very very spongy, and required me to pump the brakes and slam all on, to come to a stop.

I had the trike back to the garage, and it seems the masre cylider is for a car, and the front brake / left hand rear are both on the same pot, with the right hand rear on a seperate pod.

Although I have managed to have the brakes sorted 80% (ish) I am still not too happy. Having rode the trike home for approx 6 miles, the front disk / caliper are hot to the touch, and would remove your finger prints if not carefull.

Does anyone have any further suggestions ???

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8)  Smoggy !!

August 1, 2011 at 4:19 PM Flag Quote & Reply

mike
Member
Posts: 99

what year and model is your trike? first all Rewaco's master cylinders are from cars,

nothing wrong with that. you mention the word pot and you have two, do you mean you have two martster cylinders?as for the front brake caliper are deliberately small so it acts like a compensator say 70% 30%more than 30% on the front brake would be extremely dangerous when breaking hard, and they do get hot.

if you're not sure about  your front brake temperaturetry   Try driving  a couple of miles without using the brake pedal ( use your gear box and hand break to stop) then checked the temperature off the front brake, it may be slightly warm but if it's hot you have a problem with the caliper binding up.(legal bit, you do this entirely at your own risk)   Cheers Mike

August 3, 2011 at 5:03 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Rob
Member
Posts: 11

mike at August 3, 2011 at 5:03 AM

what year and model is your trike? first all Rewaco's master cylinders are from cars,

nothing wrong with that. you mention the word pot and you have two, do you mean you have two martster cylinders?as for the front brake caliper are deliberately small so it acts like a compensator say 70% 30%more than 30% on the front brake would be extremely dangerous when breaking hard, and they do get hot.

if you're not sure about  your front brake temperaturetry   Try driving  a couple of miles without using the brake pedal ( use your gear box and hand break to stop) then checked the temperature off the front brake, it may be slightly warm but if it's hot you have a problem with the caliper binding up.(legal bit, you do this entirely at your own risk)   Cheers Mike

Mikes right great way to test where the problems coming from.  If still excessively hot following this procedure I would look towards your push rod adjustment. If as you say the master cylinder was removed and refurbished possibly the rod adjustment may have changed on reassembly. A certain amount of free play is essential. Good luck front braking with the grimeca caliper is really tempremental mine siezed solid when I was driving but should have noticed the signs.   Cheers Rob

August 5, 2011 at 2:38 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Mad Mick
Member
Posts: 6

Hi there, you have been right to check all these things but if yours has drum brakes on the rear the master cylinder has a risidual valve built in to maintain 3>4 lb pressure to keep the wheel cyl. cups flaired out. This will make the caliper stay on as well. I suggest you remove the valve and put in a line risidual valve to the back wheel. Also to help bleed the brakes bleed the master cyl. on the bench before installing on the trike as the angle it is on in the trike will trap air at one end or jack the back up high enough to get the master cyl. level

Regards Mad Mick

August 11, 2011 at 4:27 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Mad Mick
Member
Posts: 6

I suppose I should have told you where to find the residual line valve.

In the master cylinder where the pipe to the wheel goes in under the seat the pipe seals against is a small rubber valve. To remove this carefully screw a self tapping screw into the seat then pull the seat out with a pair of pliers or hold the head of the screw in a vice and lever the m/cyl away, the valve will then come out so you can put the seat back in. With the rear part of the cyl. there are 2 pipes so you only have to do the 1 that goes to the front disc brake. To check if the valves are in there carefully put a match or similer into the hole and you should feel it.

Mad Mick

September 5, 2011 at 3:03 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Smoggy
Member
Posts: 4

Mad Mick,

sorry for the delayed reply, I am currently working in Indonesia, and have been too busy patrying to look at the web, (only joking). I have been working 12+hours, 7 days a week, and with my trike garaged, I have put it to the back of my mind.

I did manage to find someone competent in repairing the brakes, so hopefully this dilema is at an end.

One more request to everyone. I live in Smoggyland (Teesside), and am looking for a competent Garage to give my Trike a 100% overhaul. does anyone have any reccomendations???  I hope to be home Mid - April.

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8)  Smoggy !!

March 26, 2012 at 12:45 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Jimmy
Member
Posts: 150

Hi Smoggy,

 

I live in Durham and to answer your question in short there are no garages up north I'd put a trike into, you'll pull up and the first thing they'll ask is "what is it" & "where  do you plug the lap top into" complete waste of time.

 

I know I'm being sterotypical here but most modern day mechanics don't have a clue about carbs, the thing I did was get a good book and learn to do it myself.

 

I'm by no means a mechanic but once you get into it, it really is simple + everyone on here is always on hand to help and I'm just up the A19 if you get stuck.

A good site regarding engines is volkzone anything thats not on here is not worth knowing.

 

Hope this helps

 

Jimmy

March 26, 2012 at 6:30 AM Flag Quote & Reply

John.Hewitt AKA Paperboy
Member
Posts: 10

Hi Guys i have a similar problem I have a Rewaco HS5 1999.A few months ago the front brake (Grimaco)caliper got that hot that it melted the plastic dust cover and the pistons inside.I bought new pistons and seals but then i still had problems with i getting red hot and smoke coming from it.Went and bought a new Master cylinder fit that bled the brakes seemed to be working fine but the brakes didnt seem to be working as good as they should so i ajusted the nut up on the master cylinder and the brakes worked alot better but then the front brake started getting very hot and smoking again so i backed off the nut on the Master Cylinder to its original setting but im back to the brakes not working all too well.Not quite sure what to try next.Any Ideas i would be very gratefull for all your help.

John.

April 7, 2012 at 11:56 PM Flag Quote & Reply

mike
Member
Posts: 99

Hi John Your HS5 is a1999 is probably rear  drum brakes could you confirm this? then I can get back to you. Cheers Mike

April 8, 2012 at 5:13 AM Flag Quote & Reply

John.Hewitt AKA Paperboy
Member
Posts: 10

Hi Mike, Thanks for your quick reply.yeah it is i have also just replaced the shoes and fitting kit springs ect ect.

April 8, 2012 at 5:54 AM Flag Quote & Reply

mike
Member
Posts: 99

Hi John firstly let's put this miff about drum brakes to bed, HS4/5 trikes fitted with disk breaks

have never been that good in my opinion.

Set up properly drum brakes are more efficient than standard disk brakes the downside to drum brakes are keeping them balance and excessive heat buildup.

Because the weight off the machine is much lighter than a car, heat on the rear brakes on trikes should not be a problem but the break balancing on a trike is critical therefore the drum brakes need constant attention whereas disk breaks tend to look after them selves.

350 ton aircraft massive lorries all use drum brakes so let's not knock them.

Now to your problem John you say you've had new rear breaks fitted? Are you absolutely sure they were set up correctly? If the rear brakes are old-school VW drum brakes you must fit a VW  type master cylinder because there is a residuel line valve built in to the master cylinder. This valve

keeps a small amount of hydraulic pressure on the seals of the rear slave cylinders. Note this line should not be connected to your front brake! As it would cause excessive heat on the front brake calliper. In my opinion you should consult a professional old-school VW work shop.

Overheating on the front brakes seems to be a common problem, I have written various solutions for this, one is to fit a compensating biased valve to the front hydraulics if you get the adjustable type you can set the frontbrake up how you like, magic no more heat. or fit a independent brakelever on the handlebars like real bikes. I hope this helps John?

Cheers Mike

 

April 9, 2012 at 7:10 AM Flag Quote & Reply

John.Hewitt AKA Paperboy
Member
Posts: 10

Hi Mike,Thanks for your advice they are drum brakes on the rear to which i have no problem with all i did was change the shoes and new springs ect.But i guess i should have changed the slave cylinders as well as a complete package even tho they wernt leakinng or wet in any way. I guess thats why the front brake cylinder is getting very and  smoking.

Is that what i need to do next change the slave cylinders?

Thanks John.

April 9, 2012 at 7:34 AM Flag Quote & Reply

mike
Member
Posts: 99

Hi John I'm not one for changing things if they are serviceable but you could be wasting more money, what I am saying is I think you should take it to a old-school VW man he will know what's what, it's all VW right up to the handlebars.  Cheers Mike

April 9, 2012 at 8:21 AM Flag Quote & Reply

John.Hewitt AKA Paperboy
Member
Posts: 10

Hi Mike,Thanks for all your advice i will do just that.

John.

April 9, 2012 at 8:43 AM Flag Quote & Reply

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